MakerJam 2018 Foreword, Information and Theme

Wow… It’s already the third year of MakerJam! It feels like yesterday we were just three high school students in a library with an idea. Now, two years later and each of us two years into college in very different fields, hundreds of individuals have participated in MakerJam, from nearly every state in the country and also from plenty of countries around the world!

MakerJam as an idea is not always the same thing; one year we may picture it one way, and one way we may picture it another. Furthermore, as students wih full courseloads and often jobs, not every single idea we have can make its way into the event. With that said, though, the heart of MakerJam is this: anyone has the time to dedicate one day, one hour, maybe even just one minute, to making something. It doesn’t have to be big. It doesn’t have to be complicated. It just has to be your creative energies put to use. MakerJam is a day to put your energies into something cool, and maybe even inspire you to take it a little bit further.

Now that some of my more personal ramblings are out of the way, let’s talk some specifics:

How do I participate in MakerJam?

Just make something. That’s it.

Something?

You can make anything for MakerJam. Make a model. Make a painting. Make a poem. Make a computer program. Make a sweater. As long as it has something to do with theme and you made it yourself, it is completely eligible for MakerJam.

How do I submit content to the website? Why should I?

Well, as to why, that’s up to you; it’s totally possible to participate in MakerJam and not submit anything. However, if you have any desire at all to, we strongly encourage it; this website is a goldmine of ideas, presentations, and creations of every variety and every skill level. There’s no embarassment in sending in something “weird” or “subpar”; we’re a group of people who just like making things, and some of the best submissions we’ve had have looked ‘incomplete’ or ‘odd,’ to name a few things said about them.

As to how, you do not need to create an account. When you submit an entry, if you input your email, an account will automatically be created. If you want, you can just ignore the subsequent email, but if you think the website is really cool, you think you might want to edit your entry later on, or want to do MakerJam in the future, having an account helps keep things organized! You’ll receive a link in your email to make a password and finalize your account.

What’s theme?

The theme for MakerJam 2018 is… Support!

-The MakerJam Team

*While we are firm believers in no rules, we here at MakerJam do not condone the creation of harmful content. All posts go through our approval system; we reserve the right to refuse to promote content we deem inappropriate.

Lighting the Skies

¬† The song is my cover of Shooting Star by Owl City. This is the story of a girl who discovers her light and creates the stars, lighting the skies. For a fuller explanation; this girl looks up to the celestial beings- the sun and the moon. They are her …

Blinding Light

For MakerJam 2017: ILLUMINATE ch’boi Sarah painted a thing! I also recorded myself painting that thing! I also taught myself how to use audio samples in my chiptune tracker program, so the repetitive musical accompaniment is a result of that experiment!

Different Kinds of Illumination

Long week Long week moderating MakerJam stuff and also running 5Ks and working and other stuff So yeah I’m not gonna act like this is utterly amazing or anything but there’s something kind of nice about simplicity sometimes, y’know?

Me and my Dad

When I was given the theme of “Illuminate” my first idea was a couple of things. Some being the definition of light and another a literal object that illuminates, a light bulb. Now I love drawing and in a way drawing gives me “light” in a sense, that it helps …

Fairy Magic

My partner and I created a little fairy terrarium with fairy lights to ILLUMINATE our day! It is created with fake plants and cut out fairies with fairy lights.

The Spectrum Project

The Spectrum project was a collaboration between Emmett McElroy, Michael Davidoff, and myself; Calie Carlson. We took an average CD and attached it to a bowl. By doing so, we created a stable reflective surface which we discovered after multiple trial and errors is a perfect base for our spectrum. …